Youth Awareness












Pakistan Army once saved Khana Kaba, the holiest place in the holy city Makkah, in 1979 when a group of militants led by Juhaiman ibn Muhammad ibn Saif al Utaibi seized Khana Kaba for two weeks. The militants attacked the holiest place at the time of Fajr Prayer on 20th November, 1979 and several pilgrims were taken hostages.

It was shocking news for Islamic world when the Grand Mosque Khana Kaba was seized by the militants and during that process several guards lost their lives in cross firing. It was the second time when bloodshed occurred on the holy ground of Grand Mosque and pilgrims were taken hostages on Hajj.

Abdullah Hamid Mohammed Al-Qahtani was the leader of militants and he was the one who called the Muslims to obey him as redeemer of Islam. Juhaiman ibn Muhammad ibn Saif al Utaibi, who led the seizure of Holy Kaba, declared his brother-in-law as redeemer of Islam and turned against ruling Al-Saud dynasty.

The Saudi government tried to regain Grand Mosque but couldn’t get success for two weeks and lost several troops in the operation as well. The militants group deployed sharp shooters and snipers at key places of Grand Mosque to stop any kind of assault from Saudi troops. The lives of thousands of pilgrims were at risk as well.

For two weeks none of the attempts to rescue the people got success which created chaos among Muslims of the world. The president of Pakistan General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq asked Saudis to let Pakistan Army do the operation as the whole world were eying on them as well. Saudis allowed him to regain the Grand Mosque.

After getting permission General Zia-ul-Haq chose few very competent SSG Commandos from Pakistan Army and sent them to Saudi Arabia. The commander of SSG commandos made a very brilliant strategy against the militants which worked really well for them. SSG commanders were deployed on the ground of Grand Mosque from helicopters and pushed the snipers and militants towards basement.

Once all the militants were pushed into basement of Grand Mosque, the commander of SSG commandos asked the Saudis to flood the basement. Once the basement was flooded, they electrocuted the water which made militants unconscious and all of them including the leaders were arrested by the commandos of Pakistan Army and finished the siege of Khana Kaba.

 

SSG Commandos of Pakistan Army Saving Khana Kaba

Pakistan Army Clears Khana Kaba from Militants

SSG commandos of Pakistan Army cleared Khana Kaba and rescued thousands of hostages at in 1979 when a group of militants led by Juhaiman ibn Muhammad ibn Saif al Utaibi seized the Grand Mosque. It all happened so quickly on the morning of 20th Novermber, 1979 that the security guards couldn’t do much to protect the place.

Once Khana Kaba, the holiest place of Muslims, was seized by the militants and thousands of pilgrims were made hostages, the militants declared Abdullah Hamid Mohammed Al-Qahtani the redeemer of Islam. They asked Muslims to obey him as Mahdi, the redeemer of Islam and during the assault executed innocent pilgrims.

The armed troops of Saudis tried to regain the Grand Mosque in several attempts but militants didn’t let them entered in the ground of holy place. The siege of Khana Kaba continued for almost two weeks until SSG commandos of Pakistan Army led by former army chief General Pervez Musharraf cleared the area from militants.

The strategy applied by the commandos to regain the Grand Mosque was quite successful and they rescued the hostage pilgrims without any bloodshed. The sharp shooters and snipers of militants held the key positions at the ground of Grand Mosque and they didn’t let any person entered from the gates.

SSG commandos entered in the Grand Mosque by using helicopters and pushed the militants into basement. That’s was the best chance to capture them without bloodshed at holy place. The captain of the commandos asked the Saudis to flood the basement. Once the basement flooded with water, they electrocuted it which made the militants unconscious.

All the militants including Abdullah Hamid Mohammed Al-Qahtani and Juhaiman ibn Muhammad ibn Saif al Utaibi were arrested alive and sent to imprisonment. The Khana Kaba was cleared within two hours and SSG commandos did wonderful job which won the hearts of every Muslim. It was one of the glorious moments of Pakistan Army.

پاکستان آرمی نے کیسے خانہ کعبہ کی حفاظت کی اور شرپسند عناصر سے بازیاب کروایا۔
ایک تاریخی وڈیو دیکھیں۔
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{October 16, 2012}   Is Malala a conspiracy ?

Madeeha Ishtiaque

With the recent buzz made by certain newspapers and social media platforms, the questions that has popped up with a bang is, what is the story behind Gul Makai’s Swat Diary on BBC blogs?

The reason behind this recent development may be Abdul Hai Kakar’s, (the BBC reporter who worked with Malala) recent accounts of how the whole idea came about. Post this, rumors and conspiracy theories questioning the credibility of the 11 years girl’s account are resonating in the surrounds.

Essentially, in order to bring about a ‘humanitarian angle’ to the situation in Swat and in Northern areas, as Kakar mentions in his online interview to a newspaper, how he came up and structured the idea of Swat Diary to be written by a young girl to ‘creatively and objectively portray the situation on ground in Swat’. The concept was to choose a local girl to ‘express her emotions’ and so to represent the silenced majority of Swati girls who were denied their right to education were given a face – Malala’s. He further elaborated that with her father’s unresistant willingness to choose Malala for the job, he would phone her up every day so she could narrate the happenings of her area and her reflections on the same.

Now, whether it was Malala’s own narrative or the reporter trying to elicit a formatted response and later manicuring it to pass for a child’s narrative, are questions that seem to disturb a large audience. An audience who had happily credited an 11-year old Swati girl for her surprising maturity and sheer bravery in breaking ideological and physical shackles to raise her voice against injustice. However, my question is, should this be the pivot of importance or the fact that a father was willing to risk his child’s safety and a young girl who feared the least voicing the truth out loud, only to protect her fellows from the austerity Taliban had in ample stocks. Shouldn’t this effort be appreciated instead of being questioned?

Recently, there seems to be a concentrated effort on face book, twitter and other social media forums to justify attack against Malala, calling her a US agent and the whole issue a foreign conspiracy.

‘ Why Malala alone? Why not a dozen of Pakistani women who die of drones everyday or those who become a sacrifice in terrorist activities? Why Obama has his helicopter on hold for only her? Why prayers are being said for Malala and not for several other daughters attacked and bruised in various terror strikes?’

As a monosyllabic response: True. If you ask for more, what’s the surprise here? This is only our national tragedy to idolize those who manage to blaze the news. The rest deserve a discriminatory attitude and to learn a lesson that to earn one’s basic right and people’s support, you’ve got to make it to the headlines, else you’re eclipsed.

Hence, as we put the conspiracy theories to rest, for there are better matters clamoring for attention, including getting rid of the terrorist elements hostaging our children and lands to meet their own ends and our own disposition of noticing things only when they get a hype.




Fatima Bhutto still waiting for the Justice

Fatima Bhutto sent her younger brother Zulfiqar Jr. away from Pakistan the day Asif Ali Zardari became the country’s President.

Niece of slain former Pakistani prime minister Benazir Bhutto, Fatima Bhutto says in her latest book, her “blood froze” on the day her uncle Zardari became the president.

Zardari was accused of plotting the murder of Fatima Bhtto’s father Murtaza Bhutto. Fatima insists Zardari is the murderer of her father even though he has been acquitted of the charge.

“On 20 September, 2008, on the 12th anniversary of Papa’s death, Asif Zardari took his oath as president of Pakistan. The ceremony had been scheduled for the day before, the 19th, but had been moved on the orders of the new president, who rescheduled his big day for Saturday, Papa’s barsi,” Fatima writes in her just-released memoir “Songs of Blood and Sword”.

“As he stood in front of parliament, which had voted him into the post almost unanimously (in the same highly democratic way that General Musharraf was ‘elected’ president), he paused in his speech and asked for a moment of silence to mark the occasion of his brother-in-law’s death. My blood froze. It was as if he was taunting us.

Murtaza Bhutto was killed Sep 20, 1996, when Fatima was 14, in a shootout with police near his Karachi residence called 70 Clifton.

On Dec 3, 2009, a Karachi court acquitted 20 policemen charged with Murtaza’s killing. Fatima and her mother Ghinwa called the verdict a mockery of justice.

After Benazir’s government was dismissed in 1996, Zardari was detained for having a part in Murtaza’s assassination. However, no charges were ever proved for want of evidence as the scene of Murtaza’s assassination was wiped clean before police investigators could arrive.

“When Zardari announced himself as the PPP’s unanimously chosenpresidential candidate we knew he would stop at nothing to reach the pinnacle of power. There was no turning back for him. Against all odds, he was going to rule Pakistan. We made the decision to take Zulfi out of the country. It was decision we had been avoiding, hoping it would not be necessary, since Benazir was killed in December 2007.

“But as Zulfi was the only surviving male heir of the Bhuttos, we couldn’t take the risk of leaving him vulnerable. Besides Zulfi, the only remaining Bhuttos are (cousin) Sassi and I. We don’t live in a country with a free press, we don’t live in a country with an independent judiciary – or any judiciary for that matter. We have no safeguards against a violent and vindictive government,” Fatima writes.

The book comes at a time when Zardari is set to be deprived of his sweeping powers through a constitutional amendment being tabled in parliament Friday to transfer to the prime minister major powers like the appointment of armed forces chiefs and reduce the president to a titular head of state.

 

 




In 1995, a former ISI official told reporters that he had arranged meetings between Nawaz Sharif and Osama bin Laden. Nawaz Sharif was allegedly looking to bin Laden to help fund his 1988 campaign for Prime Minister, and was willing to say anything to get it.

“Nawaz Sharif insisted that I arrange a direct meeting with the Osama, which I did in Saudi Arabia. Nawaz met thrice with Osama in Saudi Arabia. The most historic was the meeting in the Green Palace Hotel in Medina between Nawaz Sharif, Osama and myself. Osama asked Nawaz to devote himself to “jihad in Kashmir”. Nawaz immediately said, ‘I love jihad.’ Osama smiled, and then stood up from his chair and went to a nearby pillar and said, ‘Yes, you may love jihad, but your love for jihad is this much.’ He then pointed to a small portion of the pillar. ‘Your love for children is this much,’ he said, pointing to a larger portion of the pillar. ‘And your love for your parents is this much,’ he continued, pointing towards the largest portion. ‘I agree that you love jihad, but this love is the smallest in proportion to your other affections in life.’”

This wasn’t the last we heard of Nawaz Sharif’s friendship with Osama bin Laden. In 2007, ABC News reported that Sharif took bribes from bin Laden to look the other way as militants carried out their plans in Pakistan.

Cloonan says that back in 1999 Mohamed told the FBI he arranged for a meeting between bin Laden and Sharif’s representatives. Following that meeting, Mohamed told Cloonan he delivered $1 million to Sharif’s representatives. Mohamed said the payoff was a tribute to Sharif for not cracking down on the Taliban as it flourished in Afghanistan and influenced the Northwest Frontier Province in Pakistan, according to Cloonan.

New evidence has surfaced, though, that suggests those meetings were merely the beginning of a long relationship between Nawaz Sharif and Osama bin Laden.

Nawaz Sharif, a two-time former prime minister of Pakistan and current head of one of the country’s major political parties, has met with Osama bin Laden on numerous occasions, and it was in fact the al Qaeda leader who developed the relationship between Sharif and the Saudi royal family, says a former Pakistani intelligence official.




Shahzeb Jillani

By Shahzeb Jillani South Asia Editor, BBC World Service

Indian army soldiers attacking Naya Chor in Sindh in support of Bengali rebels of the liberation army during the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971

I was born in the middle of a cold winter night in December 1971 in Sindh, Pakistan. There was a blackout and bombs were falling.

Pakistan was losing a war and it was also losing its eastern half, separated from the rest of the country by more than 1,600km (990 miles) of India.

After nine months of internal strife and a military crackdown against Bangladeshi separatists, the full-scale war with India was swift and decisive. It lasted just 13 days.

The defeat of the Pakistani army on 16 December 1971 was a triumph for India and the Bengali insurgents it had assisted.

For Pakistan, it was perhaps the darkest moment in its history and the ultimate humiliation. The army stood accused of mass murder, torture and rape. Tens of thousands of Pakistani soldiers were taken prisoners of war.

Forty years on, I decided to examine the legacy of this brief but bitter war.

Growing up in Pakistan, we did not talk much about the war at home. In school, we seemed to rush through that period of our history.

On a recent visit to my old school in Karachi, I picked up an officially approved history book.

The book recognises that East Pakistanis felt culturally subjugated and economically exploited by their dominant Western half.

But it suggests the causes for separation include India, Hindu propaganda and international conspiracies.

At my old school I asked a group of teenage students if they had heard of the Bangladeshi accusations of genocide or widespread rape by the Pakistani army.

“That’s wrong, that’s propaganda!” several said.

“The Pakistani army is a professional army. They are Muslims. They couldn’t have done that to their brothers and sisters over there.”

‘Foolish operation’

But if Pakistan has tried to treat the events of 1971 as a closed chapter, in Bangladesh, the wounds of the war are very fresh.

On my first ever visit to Dhaka, it was immediately clear that the Bangladeshi

Professor Serajul Islam Choudhury remembers colleagues at the Dhaka University memorial

narrative of 1971 remains firmly focused on the violence unleashed by the Pakistani army.

Many Bangladeshis still feel very bitter about their treatment by West Pakistan, with discriminatory policies over economics and language.

In 1971, the West Pakistan leadership appeared to have made up its mind to answer this resentment with military force.

“It makes me think how foolish the entire operation was, how mad it was and how tragic it was,” said Serajul Islam Choudhury, a professor at Dhaka University.

“There’s no possibility of bringing down an entire people by the military coming from abroad. The loss we suffered was enormous.”

As he stared at the list of names on a memorial honouring the teachers, students and staff of Dhaka University who died in 1971, his emotion is palpable.

“To this day, I feel very sad thinking of my colleagues who were killed during the military operations.”

Lasting 13 days, the Indo-Pakistan war is considered one of the shortest wars in history. Pakistani forces surrendered on 16 December 1971.

 

The Bangladeshi government says that three million people were killed during the nine months of conflict. Some say that figure is too high and unverifiable.

And the mainstream Bangladeshi narrative is also accused of omitting alleged atrocities perpetrated by Bengali separatists against communities who were deemed loyal to Pakistan.

Entire villages are reported to have been attacked, homes burnt and families killed.

Aly Zaker was among thousands of Bengalis who took up arms to fight for independence.

“Our target was the Pakistan occupation force and their cohorts, who were created within the confines of Bangladesh with quislings,” he says.

He believes that minorities only faced retribution after they had acted as proxies of the Pakistani army and killed Bengalis.

Existential fear

As I learned more about 1971, it seemed to me that many of the geopolitical patterns of Pakistan and the region were formed during that conflict.

Back then, the Pakistani army was accused of forming militia groups to do its bidding in East Pakistan. Since then, it has been seen to use similar tactics in Afghanistan and Kashmir.

Many warn that the dangerous nexus between the military and jihadi militant groups is now threatening Pakistan from within.

Ikram Seghal, a defence analyst who lectures in Pakistani military colleges, believes the biggest internal challenge to Pakistan today is terrorism.

But like many in the military, he sees India as the principal external threat.

“If you look at the Indian armed forces deployment along the Pakistani border – their forward bases, their armoured divisions, their strike divisions – they can mobilise and go to war with us in 72 hours.

“While for us, short of a nuclear strike, we cannot hold them.”

This existential fear of a bigger, hostile India is central to Pakistan’s security paradigm. In 1971 this fear was reinforced by the crucial role India played in the break up of Pakistan.

For India, the situation became serious when nearly 10 million Bengali refugees crossed the border into its territory. There was a humanitarian crisis, but also an opportunity to cut Pakistan down to size.

An elderly refugee walks alongside Indian troops advancing into the East Pakistan (Bangladesh) area during the Indo-Pakistani war of 1971
An elderly refugee walks alongside Indian troops advancing into East Pakistan (Bangladesh) during the Indo-Pakistani war of 1971

Pakistan’s army today

AK Khandker is a senior minister in the Bangladeshi government and served as a separatist commander in 1971.

He says India started providing weapons and training to the rebels in May of that year, and stepped up the programme after signing a pact with the Soviet Union in August.

According to Mr Khandker, the attacks by Indian-trained separatist fighters were so effective, that by November “the Pakistani army was physically and morally exhausted.”

Today he says that without India, the independence of Bangladesh “would have been extremely, extremely difficult”.

“The help that India gave to us, we are so grateful to them,” he says.

 

One might expect that the Pakistani army’s failure in 1971 would have diminished its power in the country. But in my lifetime, its influence in shaping and running the country has grown exponentially.

It seems the conclusion the Pakistani army drew from its defeat in 1971 was to grow stronger; to exercise more control over civilian affairs.

Many in Pakistan still regard the army as a saviour, the glue that holds the country together, saving it from corrupt politicians and enemies like India – and increasingly America.

But others feel it was the army’s tight grip on power that contributed to the break up of Pakistan in the first place.

They believe that the military has stifled the country’s democratic development, undermining its very fabric.

“I’m a soldier and proud of being a soldier. But all the ills of Pakistan are because of the armed forces intervention in the civilian affairs,” says Lt Gen Abdul Qadir Baloch.

He retired from the army just a few years ago and is now a member of parliament.

“If the army had not imposed as many martial laws in this country – four so far – we would have had 15 to 20 elections by now and a much better lot of politicians than the sort of pygmies we have got today.”

 




A Symbolic Depiction of Continual Struggle

The Generations Striving for a Prosperous & Progressive Pakistan




Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari left Pakistan suddenly on Tuesday, complaining of heart pains, and is now in Dubai. His planned testimony before a joint session of Pakistan’s parliament on theMemogate scandal is now postponed indefinitely.
On Dec. 4, Zardari announced that he would address Pakistan’s parliament about the Memogate issue, in which his former ambassador to Washington Husain Haqqani stands accused of orchestrating a scheme to take power away from Pakistan’s senior military and intelligence leadership and asking for U.S. help in preventing a military coup. Haqqani has denied that he wrote the memo at the heart of the scheme, which also asked for U.S. support for the Zardari government and promised to realign Pakistani foreign policy to match U.S. interests.
The memo was passed from Pakistani-American businessman Mansoor Ijaz to former National Security Advisor Jim Jones, to then Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen on May 10, only nine days after U.S. forces killed Osama bin Laden in the Pakistani military town of Abbottabad.
Ijaz has repeatedly accused Haqqani of being behind the memo, and Ijaz claims that Haqqani was working with Zardari’s implicit support.
Early on Tuesday morning, Zardari’s spokesman revealed that the president had traveled to Dubai to see his children and undergo medical tests linked to a previously diagnosed “cardiovascular condition.”
A former U.S. government official told The Cable today that when President Barack Obama spoke with Zardari over the weekend regarding NATO’s killing of the 24 Pakistani soldiers, Zardari was “incoherent.” The Pakistani president had been feeling increased pressure over the Memogate scandal. “The noose was getting tighter — it was only a matter of time,” the former official said, expressing the growing expectation inside the U.S. government that Zardari may be on the way out.
The former U.S. official said that parts of the U.S. government were informed that Zardari had a “minor heart attack” on Monday night and flew to Dubai via air ambulance today. He may have angioplasty on Wednesday and may also resign on account of “ill health.”
“This is the ‘in-house change option’ that has been talked about,” said Shuja Nawaz, director of the South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council, in a Tuesday interview with The Cable. Nawaz said that this plan would see Zardari step aside and be replaced by his own party, preserving the veneer of civilian rule but ultimately acceding to the military’s wishes to get rid of Zardari.
“Unfortunately, it means that the military may have had to use its muscle to effect change yet again,” said Nawaz. “Now if they stay at arm’s length and let the party take care of its business, then things may improve. If not, then this is a silent coup with [Pakistani prime minister Yousaf Raza] Gilani as the front man.”
In Islamabad, some papers have reported that before Zardari left Pakistan, the Pakistani Army insisted that Zardari be examined by their own physicians, and that the Army doctors determined that Zardari was fine and did not need to leave the country for medical reasons. Zardari’s spokesman has denied that he met with the Army doctors.
One Pakistani source told The Cable that Zardari was informed on Monday that none of the opposition party members nor any of the service chiefs would attend his remarks to the parliament as a protest against his continued tenure. This source also said that over a dozen of Zardari’s ambassadors in foreign countries were in the process of being recalled in what might be a precursor to Zardari stepping down as president, taking many of his cronies with him.
Pakistan’s Dawn newspaper reported that before leaving, Zardari met separately with Gilani, Chairman of the Senate Farooq H Naik, and Interior Minister Rehman Malik.
This past weekend, the Memogate scandal worsened for Zardari when Ijaz alleged in a Newsweekopinion piece that Zardari and Haqqani had prior knowledge of the U.S. raid to kill bin Laden, and may have given permission for the United States to violate Pakistan’s airspace to conduct the raid.
On May 2, the day after bin Laden was killed, Wajid Hasan, Pakistan’s high commissioner to the United Kingdom, said in an interview with CNN that Pakistan, “did know that this was going to happen because we have been keeping — we were monitoring him and America was monitoring him. But Americans got to where he was first.”
In a statement given to the Associated Press of Pakistan Monday, White House spokespersonCaitlin Hayden said that information on the actual operation to kill bin Laden was not given to anyone in Pakistan.
“As we’ve said repeatedly, given the sensitivity of the operation, to protect our operators we did not inform the Pakistani government, or any other government, in advance,” she said.
Zardari lived in self-imposed exile in Dubai from 2004 through 2007 after being released from prison, where he had been held for eight years on corruption charges. His three children live there, but his 23-year son Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, the chairman of the Pakistan People’s Party (PPP), is in Pakistan now.


{December 6, 2011}   Hatred among two neighbors

I do not think i have to write a summary of this particular video. It says it all. Two neighboring countries clashes many times in the past & now Atomic powers are decisively hate each other.

Views should judge who was dirty in it’s speech and who was defensive.

That was Love (Muhabbat)

Paigham hamara hai Muhabbat – jahan tak pohonche

Aur jahan na pohonche , un k lie ye video 😉






{November 23, 2011}   Imran Khan is No Choice !

Post by:
Syed Ali

Oct 18, 2011

Imran Khan & Jamima

About his youth mistakes, Imran Khan (IK) says that he never claims that he is an angel. Also, he says that these are his personal matters and these should not be mixed with his political career. Well, when he wants to be a public leader, everything of his character will be discussed. IK always talks of Constitution and INSAAF, how will he fulfill the requirement of articles 62 and 63 (articles of constitution that speaks about character. Not to mention, adultery is a big sin). If he claims, he fulfills the requirement of 62 and 63, it means he will lie just like other majority of politicians. A person who contests election on the basis of lie cannot bring justice, the slogan of IK to deceive Pakistanis. IK cannot provide justice to his own illegitimate daughter how can he provide justice to whole nation? Let us have a look on some of his U-turns. He could not make right decision about Jemima! He could not establish correct opinion about Musharaf. He was against MQM and now he is a kind of admirer of MQM. He was once with Nawaz Sharif and now deadly against Nawaz. IK apologized on his support to Musharaf and recently he accepted gift (puppies) from him? IK still maintains contact with his former wife Jemima; he went to England to run election campaign for Jemima’s brother.And it goes on and on…What kind of IK image comes to mind after all this? IK could not manage his married life how would he mange the whole country.

When he was raising funds for Cancer hospital, he always denied categorically the possibility of entering politics whenever he was interviewed by press. Everybody knows, after cancer hospital he entered politics. He should be honest enough to mention role of then government in establishing cancer hospital. Government provided land free of cost for hospital and gave tax exemption. Plus government sponsored him to raise funds by providing him security and managing the crowds of public in fund raising campaign.

IK’s blind supporters bring examples from Islamic history like Omar ibne Khattab and Khalid bin Walid (Radi-Allaho Anhum.)Omar Ibne Khattab and Khalid Bin Walid (Radi-Allaho Anhum) were characterful and brave even before embracing Islam. Secondly, Prophet (Sallalho Alaihe Wassalam) himself gave them great titles. Was Imran Khan non Muslim when he committed adultery and living a sexual animal life? There is question mark on his character even today. Why should Pakistani risk their future by voting for a man whose past was characterless and present is doubtful? If IK repents on his past, he has every right to lead a respectful personal life (but he surely does not become eligible to lead a nation).A personal repentance or apology does not clean your past for official purposes unless you receive a judicial pardon or punishment.No criminal is forgiven without completing a due course of law.Is IK above law?If his IK’s repentance makes him innocent then what is the fault of thousands of criminals in Jail; certainly majority of them repent on their wrong deeds.

The supporter of IK calls him “VISIONARY” leader.What vision does he have? Only boastings with no plans to execute them. Not to mention, there are no elections in PTI ever. PTI is one man show.IK is man with no character and surely he is void of wisdom too.

 



et cetera
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